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Fresh Slices of Old Florida

OLD FLORIDA IS tan bare feet. Turquoise waters. Pink motels. On cool evenings, it’s sweet tea on the porch of a rusty-roofed cabin. The smell of citrus blossoms. Banjos, harmonicas and fiddles. On a lazy Sunday, it’s quiet country roads with tunnel-like canopies of centuries-old live oaks. Mom and Pop gift shops. Roadside produce stands with sweet corn and watermelon. Old Florida is manatees. Crystal clear springs. Rope swings. An aluminum boat. Night crawlers. Mostly, Old Florida is home.






Read the Printed Word!

A maypole is a tall wooden pole erected as a part of various European folk festivals, particularly on May Day, or Pentecost (Whitsun) although in some countries it is instead erected at Midsummer. In some cases the maypole is a permanent feature that is only utilised during the festival, although in other cases it is erected specifically for the purpose before being taken down again.
Primarily found within the nations of Germanic Europe and the neighbouring areas which they have influenced, its origins remain unknown, although it has been speculated that it originally had some importance in the Germanic paganism of Iron Age and early Medieval cultures, and that the tradition survived Christianisation, albeit losing any original meaning that it had. It has been a recorded practice in many parts of Europe throughout the Medieval and Early Modern periods, although became less popular in the 18th and 19th centuries. Today, the tradition is still observed in some parts of Europe and among European communities in North America.

maypole is a tall wooden pole erected as a part of various European folk festivals, particularly on May Day, or Pentecost (Whitsun) although in some countries it is instead erected at Midsummer. In some cases the maypole is a permanent feature that is only utilised during the festival, although in other cases it is erected specifically for the purpose before being taken down again.

Primarily found within the nations of Germanic Europe and the neighbouring areas which they have influenced, its origins remain unknown, although it has been speculated that it originally had some importance in the Germanic paganism of Iron Age and early Medieval cultures, and that the tradition survived Christianisation, albeit losing any original meaning that it had. It has been a recorded practice in many parts of Europe throughout the Medieval and Early Modern periods, although became less popular in the 18th and 19th centuries. Today, the tradition is still observed in some parts of Europe and among European communities in North America.


Hi-Res Photo

5.1.2013 |
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