Fresh Slices of Old FloridaToggle Filters

Fresh Slices of Old Florida

Many people don't know what old Florida was like so I want to show you all that's historic, beautiful, retro, kitschy and untamed. Much of it has changed now, but you can still be a part of the adventure if you look in the right places. I love writing about Florida and submissions are always welcomed.

Enjoy your stay in the F.L.A.






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Diving Deep with Real-Life Mermaid @hannahmermaid

To keep up with Hannah’s underwater adventures, follow @hannahmermaid on Instagram.

Mermaid model Hannah Fraser (@hannahmermaid) doesn’t just have a passion for deep water, she considers the ocean to be her workspace. Outside coming face-to-face with whales, manta rays or even sharks, the most challenging part of her job is staying calm and maintaining a natural appearance while underwater. “I need to slow my heartbeat down by mentally relaxing, going into a meditative state where I am not thinking about anything other than where I am and the feeling of being comfortable and at one with the underwater world. This is especially important if I am swimming with wild animals.”

9.15.2014 |
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Hillbilly Jamboree at WCTV for Ford Tractors - Tallahassee, Florida
1956
  • Hillbilly Jamboree at WCTV for Ford Tractors - Tallahassee, Florida
  • 1956


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9.13.2014 |
27
lumin0l:

1950 by Jodie Dobson on Flickr.

lumin0l:

1950 by Jodie Dobson on Flickr.

(via lumin0l-deactivated20140912)


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9.12.2014 |
178
billyboardwalk:

Sea oats and sky
Fort De Soto

billyboardwalk:

Sea oats and sky

Fort De Soto


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9.12.2014 |
75

Standard Guide to Florida’s East Coast and Nassau, 1908

9.12.2014 |
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"Magnolia Springs takes its name from a magnificent spring, whose waters, besides being remarkable for their purity and excellence as table waters, have well-attested therapeutic qualities, especially in rheumatic affections." -Standard Guide to Florida, 1908

"Magnolia Springs takes its name from a magnificent spring, whose waters, besides being remarkable for their purity and excellence as table waters, have well-attested therapeutic qualities, especially in rheumatic affections." -Standard Guide to Florida, 1908


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9.11.2014 |
57
cardboardamerica:

Les Chateaux Motel - Miami Beach, Florida
6444 Indian Creek Drive Miami Beach, Florida Completely Air Conditioned - Heated - Luxury Apartments and Hotel Rooms. Private Dock - Fishing - Free Parking. Mailed from Miami Beach, Florida to Mrs. Lillian M. Waters of Southampton, Pennsylvania on May 29, 1963: Dear Lillian - Am leaving on an extended motor trip of 2 or 3 months. I will write you when I return and explain everything - as well as advise you of my new address. My apologies for everything. Sincerely, Eve Landry

cardboardamerica:

Les Chateaux Motel - Miami Beach, Florida

6444 Indian Creek Drive
Miami Beach, Florida
Completely Air Conditioned - Heated - Luxury Apartments and Hotel Rooms. Private Dock - Fishing - Free Parking.

Mailed from Miami Beach, Florida to Mrs. Lillian M. Waters of Southampton, Pennsylvania on May 29, 1963:

Dear Lillian - Am leaving on an extended motor trip of 2 or 3 months. I will write you when I return and explain everything - as well as advise you of my new address.
My apologies for everything.
Sincerely,
Eve Landry


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9.10.2014 |
61
Snider’s Brass Band - Mount Pleasant, Florida, 1880s
Back row, left to right: Mr. Shepard, Mr. Shepard, Mr. Shepard, Willie Snider, Lucy Snider. Front row: George Snider, Frank Snider, John S. Snider, Asbury W. Snider.
State Archives of Florida

Snider’s Brass Band - Mount Pleasant, Florida, 1880s

Back row, left to right: Mr. Shepard, Mr. Shepard, Mr. Shepard, Willie Snider, Lucy Snider. Front row: George Snider, Frank Snider, John S. Snider, Asbury W. Snider.

State Archives of Florida


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9.10.2014 |
39
US 41, Lake City
Postcard on Bidstart.com

US 41, Lake City

Postcard on Bidstart.com


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9.9.2014 |
26
eatsflorida:

St Petersburg Food History: Pineapples
Edwin Tomlinson, St Petersburg’s greatest benefactor likely was also an early investor in St Petersburg’s pineapple industry.  
“Everyone was confident that the growing of pineapples in Florida would rival the citrus industry in importance.  By 1900 a score of growers were engaged in the pineapple culture, including E. H. Tomlinson and St Petersburg’s first mayor David Moffett.  All specialized in the growing of “Porto Ricos,” weighing on the average of ten pounds each and many as much as twenty pounds and more.  For a time, the growers made big profits and by the summer of 1901, an average of 200 crates were being shipped daily, netting the growers from $2,000 to $5,000 an acre.  The industry died out almost as quickly as it had sprung up.  By 1905, little was heard of it.  The growers said they no longer could compete with Cuba and Puerto Rico, from which pineapples camE in in duty-free after the islands had been freed from Spain.  A crate of pineapples could be shipped by boat from Havana to New York for 75 cents, while it cost growers here $1.50 to ship a crate to the same destination.  Then the railroad increased the rate to $2 a crate and the industry died.”  (“A History of St. Petersburg” by Karl H. Grismer, 1924, Tourist News Publishing Company, St Petersburg,Florida) 

eatsflorida:

St Petersburg Food History: Pineapples

Edwin Tomlinson, St Petersburg’s greatest benefactor likely was also an early investor in St Petersburg’s pineapple industry.  

“Everyone was confident that the growing of pineapples in Florida would rival the citrus industry in importance.  By 1900 a score of growers were engaged in the pineapple culture, including E. H. Tomlinson and St Petersburg’s first mayor David Moffett.  All specialized in the growing of “Porto Ricos,” weighing on the average of ten pounds each and many as much as twenty pounds and more.  For a time, the growers made big profits and by the summer of 1901, an average of 200 crates were being shipped daily, netting the growers from $2,000 to $5,000 an acre.  The industry died out almost as quickly as it had sprung up.  By 1905, little was heard of it.  The growers said they no longer could compete with Cuba and Puerto Rico, from which pineapples camE in in duty-free after the islands had been freed from Spain.  A crate of pineapples could be shipped by boat from Havana to New York for 75 cents, while it cost growers here $1.50 to ship a crate to the same destination.  Then the railroad increased the rate to $2 a crate and the industry died.”  (“A History of St. Petersburg” by Karl H. Grismer, 1924, Tourist News Publishing Company, St Petersburg,Florida) 


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9.4.2014 |
54